salmon

Swinging for Kings in Alaska

Swinging for Kings in Alaska

Join us in June 2018 for kings and rainbows on the swing If you’ve been looking to fish Alaska with a spey rod…June is the perfect month for it!  We will be offering two featured weeks, June 11-18 and June 18-25, where the focus will be swinging flies. In the spring the trout are hungry and aggressive, and will absolutely attack streamers and mice.  This offers a great opportunity to work on your technique with a lot of positive reinforcement.  During the week of 18th-25th we will shift our attention towards swinging for kings.  There’s not much that can compare to hooking a 20+ pound king on a spey rod. When fishing for rainbows we recommend a 11′-12.5′ 6wt switch or spey rod.  Depending on the water conditions, and your preference, you could be fishing a mouse with a floating line or streamers on sink tips.  King fishing will be on the Nushagak and/or Alagnak, two of Alaska’s best salmon rivers.  We will be using 12.5′-14′ 9 or 10 weight spey rods and fishing heavy, with sink tips and big streamers. Experienced spey caster? Great!  We will get you right into fishing.  However, one of the best things about spey casting is that there’s always ways to improve.  So we can help you fine tune your casting motion and your fishing techniques. Never picked up a spey rod, or just getting started? Not a problem! On Monday we will offer an afternoon of spey casting instruction to get you started.  Whether you are a total beginner to fishing with a two-handed rod, or are looking to improve your skills, we will customize the instruction to your level and goals.  Over the course of the week we will keep working with you to give you a solid foundation to build on. Spring in Alaska Of course we can’t talk about June in Alaska without mentioning the weather!  The average highs are in the low 60’s and there’s that midnight sun.  All of that sunlight makes for a stunning landscape with bright greens and all shades of vibrant wild flowers.  With daily fly outs you really get a chance to enjoy all the different scenery from the ground, and the sky.  It’s a great time of year for Alaskan adventures! Contact us for more details or to book your spot!  

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A Salmon’s Life Cycle: An Incredible Journey

A Salmon’s Life Cycle: An Incredible Journey

We talk a lot about fly-fishing here at the lodge but we also get many questions about the Salmon life cycle. Salmon make an incredible journey downstream from the fresh water where they are born, to the ocean, and then back upstream again as adults, finding the exact location where they began several years earlier. Salmon Eggs Salmon lay their eggs in many streams and rivers. Depending on the species, a female salmon will lay anywhere from 1,500 to 7,000 eggs in a nest or redd she has created by making a shallow depression in the stream bottom. The male fertilizes the eggs and then both fish push gravel over them to protect them. Hatching Salmon Young fish or alevins hatch in late winter or early spring, looking more like worms than fish. These tiny fish depend on a yolk sac to provide them with nourishment until they are mobile enough to wiggle out of the gravel and find their own food. At this stage, the young salmon are called fry. Feeding on tiny plants and animals, the fry cluster in groups and develop into juveniles. Salmon Fry Cluster in Groups When juveniles are ready to migrate to the ocean, they undergo a physiological transition from freshwater to saltwater fish. Only about 10 percent of the fry make it to this stage and are called smolts. Smolt Development. Only 10 Percent Make it to This Stage.   Smolts are especially vulnerable and are frequently injured or killed by predators. Dams also slow the migration considerably. A trip that used to take one to three weeks can now take one to three months, depending on the beginning point of the trip. The smolts have limited energy stored in their bodies and may run out before they are able to reach the ocean. Up to 90 percent of the salmon hatched never reach the ocean. Salmon Spawning The smolts that complete the journey downstream spend several weeks in estuaries where the river meets the ocean, feeding on small fish and shrimp. Eventually, they disappear into the ocean where they grow to adulthood. After two to five years, the adult salmon are ready to migrate upriver to spawn in the streams where they were hatched. It is believed that salmon are guided to the rivers by currents, stars, and the Earth’s magnetic force. Once in the river, the fish find their home streams by scent. The journey upriver is a difficult one. Salmon do not eat during this time, but live on fat stored in their body. They may travel as far as 1,440 km in fresh water to their spawning grounds. Obstacles encountered upstream are many and varied. Dams, waterfalls, bears, uncertain stream conditions, and habitat degradation are among the most common challenges for salmon.

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