Fishing

Welcome to the world of fly fishing in Alaska where you’re cordially invited to wade right in and read all about the greatest outdoor sport on the planet. We admit it. We’re insanely partial to posting about everything that makes the hearts of trout bums beat a little bit faster. You have to admit it too. You wouldn’t be here if you didn’t share our passion for the art of a careful cast and a perfect presentation.

What do we cover in this section of our ongoing and always-entertaining blogs? We post about sockeyes and bows and dolly varden. We share fishing tips and angling tricks. We laugh at some of the worst fly fishing advice we’re ever heard, and then we turn into softies teaching the kids in our lives how to cast. If you love variety, climb aboard, and start reading. It’s the next best thing to hanging out with us in front of the lodge fireplace.

Our Five Favorite Rivers for Fly Fishing in Alaska

Our Five Favorite Rivers for Fly Fishing in Alaska

Everybody has an opinion. Every fisherman who’s been lucky enough to cast through a perfect day in the Last Frontier knows its best rivers for fly fishing. Every single angler is right, too. Recognizing this fact of fishing life makes it easier for us to put together our list. We know that you know the best, so we’re going to play it safe and just call these five locations our five favorite fly fishing rivers here in Alaska. 1. The Kenai River   Running more 80 wild miles through the Alaskan panhandle to Cook Inlet, this river earns its reputation as a trophy-fish paradise. If that wasn’t enough to land it on our list of favorites, its spectacular backdrop of the Chugach Mountains seals the deal. The lower Kenai’s chinook runs are legendary, and we’re crazy about catching 20-pound rainbows on the upper river. Sockeye numbers from the middle of July through summer’s end can top 1 million. Cohos jump in by early August, and an average Dolly Varden tips the scales at 4 to 6 pounds. We admit that we’re partial to the upper Kenai’s seclusion and scenery. 2. The Copper River You have to love a river that was one of the first in Alaska to receive a catch-and-release-only designation for rainbow fly fishing. You have to call it a favorite for winding pools and undercut banks. This is a river that nature designed for wading with gorgeous stretches through scenic valleys lined with birch, spruce and cottonwood. The Copper is big, and it runs long for 300 miles out of the Wrangell and Chugach Mountains. The star-studded salmon lineup from mid-May through October includes chinook, sockeye and coho, and Copper River rainbows are still some of the biggest in Alaska thanks to that special designation. 3. The Talachulitna River Seeing truly is believing when you can count the fish swimming by. That’s how clear the Talachulitna’s water runs on its way down from Judd Lake in the Beluga Mountains. This incredible stretch earns its place on our list of favorites with a world-class combination of breathtaking scenery and amazing fly fishing action. When someone mentions the Dolly Varden they caught on the Tal, they’ll probably also brag about the chinook, rainbow and grayling they landed. If you dream about casting while majestic, snow-capped mountains look over your shoulder, fly in to one of our favorites, and fish the Talachulitna River. 4. The Alagnak River This tributary of our very own Kvichak River is a perfect spot for folks who are just now discovering the world’s best outdoor sport. Its lower stretches are wide with plenty of sandbars to anchor waders longing to get wet. We especially enjoy schools of silver salmon holding on the shallow edges, and we love chasing kings in the deep channels. The upriver braids are an endless labyrinth of gravel beds and small channels teeming with salmon and rainbows. Some folks like this 69-mile run for whitewater adventures, but we prefer perfecting our […]

Read More →

Read More →

10 Twitter Accounts That Every Fly Fisherman Should Follow

10 Twitter Accounts That Every Fly Fisherman Should Follow

Imagine asking a fly fisherman here in Alaska about tweets 10 years ago. Picture that same angler scratching his head and wondering why you wanted to talk about chickadees. Today, Twitter has everybody hooked, and we can’t resist hashing the tags. Here’s our list of 10 Twitter accounts that every fly fisherman should follow. 1. Fly Fishing Report @FlyFishReport This latest entry in the Twitterverse doesn’t have a website yet. They do have a passion for everything about fly fishing, and their tweets hook up with breaking news, plenty of pics and great videos. FFR promises to go live in the next few months, so we strongly recommend staying tuned. RT @wildsalmoncntr: Oh, that all salmon rivers look like this! Let’s protect our last, best https://t.co/VtstcUiTBG pic.twitter.com/A1tNoh0tSb — Fly Fishing Report (@FlyFishReport) January 15, 2016 2. Simms Fishing @SimmsFishing If you’re one of the oldest fly fishing gear companies in the world, you tweet about it. We give Simms credit for focusing on tips, techniques and conservation without overselling their goods. Interested in a beautiful shot of rainbows charging minnows? Yes, they lure us in with wonderful photography. Support fish-focussed management and preserve prime salmon and trout habititat in Alaska. https://t.co/jOZy8Za7yG pic.twitter.com/DBpRHSI4Lt — Simms Fishing (@simmsfishing) December 17, 2015 3. Sage Fly Fishing @SageFlyFish Again, we’re linking up with commercial tweets, but founder Don Green always had our respect as one of the world’s master fly rod designers. It’s good to see his legacy live on in the digital world. Enjoy a mix of breaking news and breathtaking pictures. Yes, they also bait us with product updates. Ambassador Mark Raisler of @headhuntersfly with a gorgeous brown. #sageflyfish http://t.co/zOT9Vgytm4 pic.twitter.com/N5JX1aVSzU — Sage Fly Fish (@sageflyfish) September 27, 2015 4. Redington @RedingtonGear We aren’t endorsing. We just call them like we follow them. Redington’s innovative products are always worth a quick read. Besides, one click leads to another, and suddenly you’re linked up with a fly fishing story on the other side of the globe. No, they don’t tempt us with enough pictures. Battle for the flats. #findyourwater #vapenblack #behemoth @thebugparade pic.twitter.com/UFioKYq6OL — Redington (@RedingtonGear) January 24, 2016 5. April Vokey @AprilVokey We’re OK that she’s down in British Columbia because she’s developed her Fly Gal guide service into a network with worldwide connections. For a dedicated conservationist, Vokey has a seriously entertaining attitude, and that makes her tweets worth following. We always learn something new too. Long casts & separated loops go “hand in hand”! Yes, that was a cheesy pun. pic.twitter.com/R1EnYCNnHd — April Vokey- Fly Gal (@AprilVokey) October 28, 2015 6. Field & Stream @FieldandStream We wonder at what the first publishers of this icon might think if you could transport them here from 1895. We marvel at how well an old flagship bridges the divide between print and tweet. Enjoy top-notch content that’s always relevant even if it doesn’t give us as much fly fishing as we’d like. Kirk Deeter’s Fly-Fishing Tip: Consider Shadows and Sun https://t.co/gZFRWj0rY2 pic.twitter.com/jWLXSp3jSB — Field […]

Read More →

Read More →

10 Tips to Improve Your Fly Fishing Powers

10 Tips to Improve Your Fly Fishing Powers

Besides the rod, reel, waders and flies, there’s something else that sets you apart from other sportsmen. You love your game enough to do it all day, every day. As a dedicated fly fisherman, you relish the idea of spending the rest of your life getting better and better at the only outdoor sport that really matters. We add to your ongoing quest for knowledge with these 10 tips to improve your fly fishing. 1. Start Out Shallow You’ll eventually get all the way out there, so don’t storm the river without exploring that shallow water first. Take your time, ease your way in with a few short casts, and enjoy the salmon and trout that rise to your shallow presentations. Ignore your buddies’ sideways looks while you get the fishing day off to a productive start. You don’t always have to be hip-deep to hit serious action. 2. Add Accuracy to Those Short Casts Now that you appreciate the overlooked art of staying shallow, you realize that you haven’t had much practice with the unappreciated short cast. It isn’t easy, but it’s a technique that you can master over time. Until then, give your rod an advantage with an overweight. It sounds too simple to be true, but overweighting by just one line weight can turn you into a master short-caster. 3. Stay on the Move Don’t enjoy that shallow action so much that you start working one spot over and over perfecting your presentation. You know the raw aggression of a salmon anywhere near a good fly. Trout make up for their short feeding season with a frenzy. Give them your best, and move on with your chin held high when they ignore you. They aren’t the only fish in the river. 4. Learn to Read That Foam Develop a talent for foam reading, and you’ll always be on top of main current seams. As the water flow moves the foam, you know it’s moving the buffet that entices hungry fish, so follow the flow line. It’s also an excellent strategy for catching minor drag problems. If your fly isn’t moving in synch with the foam, it’s time to make some adjustments. 5. Go Prepared for Anything Are you ready to catch something besides chinook and rainbow? Don’t limit your chances for action with a two-species mindset. Surprise your guide the night before you head out with an idea to fish for something that isn’t salmon or trout. He’s your go-to guy for everything it takes to catch something outside the tackle box, and he’ll appreciate your sense of adventure. 6. Let Go of Perfection If you could nail every cast on the money, you probably wouldn’t be reading this list. If you’re like most other fly fishermen, you sometimes miss the mark, and that’s OK. Relax, and take a deep breath. While you figure out what went wrong, just go with the drift. Fly fishing is as much mental as it is physical, so don’t wear yourself […]

Read More →

Read More →

Planning a Fly Fishing Trip? The Worst Advice You’ll Ever Get

Planning a Fly Fishing Trip? The Worst Advice You’ll Ever Get

Friends are excited to see you heading off for the Last Frontier, and everyone has an opinion. If you’ve managed this wonderful escape before, it’s easy to separate good and bad advice. If this is your first chance to fly fish in Alaska, be careful. If this is your first chance to fly fish in Alaska, be careful. Some tips are great, some are crazy, and some are just plain awful. We nominate these five nuggets as the worst advice we’ve ever heard about planning a fly fishing trip. 1. Buy All Your Gear at Home You already have a favorite rod and reel, but you’re excited about the upcoming trip and ready to restock that tackle box with fresh flies and beads. Friends who tell you to buy new gear before you take off believe that it’s money-saving advice. It might be if you can completely outfit a trip at the nearest big box store. You want to hit the river with the right equipment, so wait, and do some shopping up here. It’s easier to match tackle with water and fish when you’re on the scene. 2. Cheap Lodges Are Just Fine We know that an Alaskan fly fishing trip isn’t always easy on the budget. You can find lodges with rock-bottom rates, and you get what you pay for. Cheap accommodations don’t come with frills like good food, comfortable beds and outdoor balconies. The money you save doesn’t go towards experienced guides, licensed pilots and a friendly staff. You don’t have to stay at a luxury lodge to enjoy the very best up here, but don’t shortchange your chance for an unforgettable getaway by booking with a low-ball outfit. 3. Local Tackle Shops Don’t Offer Much You won’t find fancy floor displays and acres of equipment. You will find some of your best resources for the latest news on rivers, runs and weather reports at the local tackle shop. The folks who own these small operations have spent their lives up here, they love to talk about fly fishing, and they don’t charge a thing for their expert advice. Which flies are working right now? What river blew out yesterday? Get to know the local fly shop, and you’ll be on top of it all. You’ll make great new friends, too. 4. You Don’t Need a Guide You can rent an isolated cabin, check your maps and head for the nearest river. You can spend your entire trip trying to figure out why you aren’t catching anything. The alternative is hooking up with a seasoned guide who makes a living by making sure you land plenty of fish. His experience is a great teacher, and his patience is legendary. We have more than 3,000 rivers to explore here in Alaska, and it just takes one professional guide to put you on top of the action. 5. Fishing Is All You Get to Do Fly fishing never gets old, but it’s not the only thing that you’ll love […]

Read More →

Read More →

Five Tips for Tutoring Your Youngest Fishing Buddy

Five Tips for Tutoring Your Youngest Fishing Buddy

How old were you when you cast your first fly? Do you remember that combination of wonder and excitement? Whether you started out as a kid or tackled fishing a little later in life, it’s fun to think back on those days when your lack of finesse didn’t matter. Learning how to do something that calls to your spirit is one of life’s better joys. Passing along that passion to a child connects you both on levels that stay strong for a lifetime. When you’re ready to tutor a young fishing buddy in the ways of Alaskan fly fishing, focus on these five productive tips. 1. Bait That Natural Curiosity If a child watches intently and wants to know why you put together those bug-looking things, he’s a good candidate for the river. If he likes to explore the tackle box, show him your case, and tell him why different fish chase different flies. Most young anglers don’t care about the details, but they’ll listen when you explain that fish are like people with different appetites. The fact that you sit at a table making fake insects is enough to impress any curious kid, so show him how to tie a wooly bugger. Ask him if he’d like to try it out, and watch that little face light up as you start planning a day together on the water. 2. Fit the Gear to the Kid As much as you love your old gear, your youngest fisherman really wants his own stuff. Resist the temptation to pass off your favorites as sentimental hand-me-downs, and head for the pro shop. From kid-sized rods and waders to pint-sized hats and shades, you’ll find everything for outfitting a short-statured novice. Let him try out a few rods for size while you consider weight options. Most 6-weight rods are heavy enough for a child’s cast, but you might want a 4- or 5-weight for someone small who doesn’t need as much stiffness. A kid’s enthusiasm goes a lot further when he’s not worn out from working a rod that’s hard to handle. 3. Don’t Make Casting Complicated Your littlest angler won’t master the perfect cast in one season. You can fine-tune techniques later, so concentrate on the basics for now. Try a simple approach to casting that starts with a two-hand hold on the rod and thumbs on top. Instruct your young student to quickly lift the rod, and then give it a sudden stop even with his ear as the line goes straight behind him. Follow through with a smooth forward motion that puts the tip at eye level to loop the line and deliver that fly. Never underestimate the power of patient encouragement and sincere compliments as he starts to get the drift. 4. Make Everything Easy to Enjoy Getting a kid hooked on fly fishing should always be about having a good time. Give that budding fisherman a fighting chance for a great start in water that you know promises plenty of […]

Read More →

Read More →

Our 10 Favorite Fly Fishing Writers

Our 10 Favorite Fly Fishing Writers

We considered putting together a list of the best, but that started too many arguments. Instead, we offer a collection of our 10 favorite writers who always manage to translate the fly fishing experience into words that we really enjoy. The next time you’re stuck inside waiting for the weather to break, break out one of these authors. For easy reference and an end to friendly disagreements, we’ve alphabetized our list. 1. James Babb Editor emeritus is a pretty impressive title, and Babb earns it with unmatched wit and style at Gray’s Sporting Journal. While we admire his well-earned literary credentials, he could be a lonely guy writing from the bed of his truck and still make this list with his book, “River Music.” He’s that good. When our copy of Gray’s hits the mailbox, we hit Babb’s fishing essay first. 2. Kirk Deeter If you ever thought that you missed your calling as a fly fishing guide, read Deeter’s essays on what the professional’s life is really like. If you want to know everything about every type of fly, knot and line, snag one of his reference books. Deeter knows his stuff, and he generously shares it all with his blog over at Field and Stream. We admit it. We also enjoy the great photography. 3. John Gierach Anybody who writes a book titled “Sex, Death and Fly Fishing” earns a place on this list. We won’t give away the first essay in this highly entertaining volume, but it involves mayflies. Gierach does more than put a knowing smile on your face. The original trout bum’s advice, strategies and river wisdom make any one of his 33 books a must-have for your fly fishing library. 4. Ted Leeson We have a real winner here. Leeson snagged the IFFF’s Roderick Haig-Brown Award for outstanding fly fishing lit back in 1996, but you probably know him better from Field and Stream. If our sport had a philosophy professor, it would be Leeson, and his volume, “The Habit of Rivers,” would be the only class assignment anyone would ever need. His writing captures and celebrates the spirit that makes us all love fishing. 5. Nick Lyons No fly fishing book collection is complete without several well-worn classics including a copy of “Spring Creek.” Lyons is a prolific writer and independent publisher, and we’re still turning his pages after more than 30 years. His ability to string together wisdom and humor makes us all proud of our collective fly fishing obsessions. We salute both his talent and longevity. 6. Thomas McGuane Settle in, and travel from Florida to Russia and Montana to Iceland. You’ve probably never imagined fly fishing in the Andes, but McGuane puts you there as he paints pictures with words that capture the essence of some of the world’s most beautiful rivers and lakes. His essays are timeless, he’s been writing for more than 30 years, and he’s very funny. 7. Howell Raines A Pulitzer Prize for journalism isn’t necessary to […]

Read More →

Read More →

10 Tools Every Alaskan Fly Fisher Should Be Using

10 Tools Every Alaskan Fly Fisher Should Be Using

You wouldn’t be caught on the river without sharp nippers and sturdy hemostats. You respect the fish with rubber nets and baby your favorite flies with waterproof cases. Beyond the basics, it’s easy to get overloaded with gear and gadgets, so we recommend these 10 essential tools that every Alaskan fly fisherman should be using. 1. Save Your Eyes With a Fly Threader Changing out flies in a flash is a snap with a handy fly threader. Shady spots don’t slow you down when you have one of these simple tools, and it really ups production at sunrise and sunset. The basic configuration provides magnetic slots for different fly sizes that let you handle the smallest eye by simply sliding the tippet down a funneled channel. 2. See Better With a Clip-On Do you need a better bead on that threader? How about a small magnifier that clips on your hat’s brim? This extra eye instantly doubles your visual powers. Most models sport lightweight clips and hinges that secure the magnifier out of the way until you need it. When the job warrants a closer look, you’re ready to stay focused. Just fold the rectangular viewer back over your brim when you’re done. 3. Pouch Your Patterns Dry This remedy for soaked flies is one of your best Alaskan fly fishing buddies. It works like magic, but the secret ingredients are natural materials that suck up moisture with a firm squeeze and revive drowned flies for immediate action. Most drying pouches measure a compact 2 inches by 3 inches with protective leather covers, and they’re versatile enough for all of your flies. 4. Stay Sharp With a Multi-Tool Some anglers swear by the trusty Swiss army knife, but you’re better off with a small tool collection designed especially for fly fishing. The best multi-tools sport hook hones, needle-noses, cutters and more. They won’t replace your gear box, but most of these handy, compact kits are just what you need when you’re waders deep in serious fly fishing action. 5. Tool Your Way to Quick-Release When you’re fly fishing in Alaska, a quality quick-release tool is always essential. It spares fish from extra handling and line tangles, and that ups their chances for quick recovery. Your hands stay dry while flies avoid damage, and that ups quality time on the water. You’ll appreciate a good quick-release tool when you’re catching more than 100 fish a day on the Kvichak River. 6. Handle Them With Landing Gloves Catch and release rules, but when you have to lay on the hands, do it with care. Landing gloves protect fish with a dual-layer outer mesh that makes it easer to handle even the biggest salmon and trout without causing harm. Hold that fish, smile for the camera, and enjoy knowing that you’re practicing the kind of responsible catch and release that helps preserve one of Alaska’s most important natural resources. 7. Refresh With a Filter Why not carry a lightweight, compact thermos that doubles […]

Read More →

Read More →

10 Sure Signs That You Need to Visit Alaska

10 Sure Signs That You Need to Visit Alaska

In your imagination, you’ve been there so many times. Once visions of the Last Frontier start dancing in your head, there’s no denying that longing in your soul. If you have any doubts about those dreams tugging on your sleeve, here are 10 sure signs that you really need to plan a trip to Alaska soon. You Count Trout Instead of Sheep – When life gets too busy, getting to sleep at night takes a little help. When you start counting rainbow trout instead of sheep, it’s time to head north. Those torpedo-shaped beauties and their brilliant colors are the fish that angling fantasies are made of. Nothing compares to the majesty of a wild rainbow flying out of the water on the end of your line. The Grid Is Officially a Grind – You’re always plugged in and powered up. Even a day off surrenders to the sound of your smartphone or taps on a tablet. It all adds up to a form of constant online overload, but you know there’s an escape. Alaska isn’t that far away, and it offers a peace and quiet that drowns out all that digital noise. You don’t have to unplug completely, but you can if you want to. Vacations Are Becoming Routine – When you think about an upcoming getaway, do you realize how often you’ve been there and done that? You need a change in scenery that rates spectacular. Imagine crystal rivers and pristine countryside. Picture landing at a rustic fishing lodge in a de Havilland Beaver and watching stars shoot across the night skies from your cabin deck. There isn’t anything routine about a vacation in the 49th State. The Wilderness Keeps Calling – Close your eyes, and listen. Do you hear the cry of a bald eagle flying overhead? Give in to that call of the wild, and add the sound of rushing water, the rustle of towering spruce and the howl of a lone wolf. It’s all a part of the natural symphony that extends an open invitation to the magic of Alaska’s unspoiled wilderness. It’s an offer that you can’t resist. Dreams of Fresh Salmon Dance on Your Palate – Nothing else compares to that incredibly pure flavor. You know a farm faux fish with the flick of a fork, but cutting into a fresh chinook salmon filet is akin to slicing butter. Regardless of what the menu tells you, your palate knows. That culinary longing for a taste of something deliciously real is a sure sign that you’re overdue making dinner reservations somewhere close to Bristol Bay. You Need a New Frontier – There’s still plenty left to conquer, but it’s hemmed in by office space and city limits. You’re not afraid of new challenges, but they begin to take on a shade of sameness. Variety is a spice that you can find anywhere, but you can only find 660,000 square miles of rugged natural beauty inside Alaska’s state lines. The Last Frontier can be your […]

Read More →

Read More →

A Brief History of Alaska Fly Fishing

A Brief History of Alaska Fly Fishing

By the time Europeans made it to Alaska in the mid-1700s, fly fishing was already an ancient sport. Flip the calendar forward about 100 years, and folks on the Continent considered it a pastime for the elite. Yes, while Alaskans were fly fishing to put food on the table, casting became an art form back in Europe. That’s not really bad when you think about it. All those lucky people with time on their hands came up with some impressive innovations that we take for granted today. Let’s start at the beginning. Everybody Was Fly Fishing It was a just another lazy afternoon in the 2nd century when Roman teacher Claudius Aelianus settled in to watch anglers casting into the Astraeus River. He was so impressed with their tackle and technique that he put stylus to tablet describing round hooks wrapped in red wool and sporting cock feathers. He sang the praises of perfectly placed casts from 6-foot poles, but the Romans didn’t have a monopoly on anything. The Japanese had been at it for centuries too, and fly fishing eventually migrated to Europe and England where it found no boundaries in age or gender. If you don’t think of women as accomplished anglers, you need to get out more. The very first book of instruction on fly fishing was written by Englishwoman Juliana Berners in 1496. Her publication was a how-to that covered rods, line, hook making and fly tying. You have to wait until the 1600s for someone to actually use the term “cast a fly.” That credit goes to Shakespeare’s fishing buddy, John Dennys, who was moved to write poetry about the sport. By then, what had started out as a necessity for filling pantries had become a favorite pastime. Mass Production Actually Helped No one documented early fly fishing in Alaska, but it’s a safe bet that the first rigs were homemade. Settling this wild territory took steel will and sharp wits, so there’s no doubt that our original anglers made their own gear. It took the Industrial Revolution and mass production to make tackle available for frustrated fishermen who were tired of twisting their own line. Running rings and pre-fab flies were considered fancy innovations, debating the pros and cons of wet versus dry became a sport of its own, and fly fishing books sailed off printing presses. The next time you drop by the Anchorage Public Library, check out a copy of “The Fly-Fisher’s Entomology.” Alfred Ronalds published this definitive volume back in 1836, but it might look familiar because it set the standard for today’s fly-fishing literature. You won’t find a better collection of angler’s eye candy. The book is beautifully illustrated with full-color plates showcasing fish and flies. Reading about the history of fly fishing in Alaska is fun, but this visual journey into the sport’s past is as inspiring as it is glorious. It Just Kept Getting Better Two very important things happened to Alaskan fly fishing in the 1950s. The first was […]

Read More →

Read More →

10 Sites You Need to Follow If You Love Alaska Fly Fishing

10 Sites You Need to Follow If You Love Alaska Fly Fishing

They might seem at odds with each other. An afternoon surfing the Internet can’t compare to time gladly lost in the magic of casting a line. Putting apples and oranges aside, the online world embraces everything on the planet including its very best outdoor sport and Alaska’s favorite pastime. Of course, we’re talking about fly fishing, and we know you’ll really enjoy these 10 sites that make our point. 1. Fish Alaska Magazine – You don’t need a subscription to enjoy this online publication dedicated to everything about fishing in Alaska. Posts are organized by topics that cover it all including ice fishing, recipes and how-to articles. Naturally, fly fishing has its own section filled with the kind of information that’s sure to help fine-tune your delivery talents. Amazing photography makes this site a keeper. 2. Mystic Waters Fly Fishing – Get it straight from the professional guides’ mouths, and read all about Kvichak River adventures, the latest fly recipes and breaking news on Alaska’s fishing action. Check out tips and tricks, product reviews and the always entertaining Strange and Unusual articles. Site contributors also cover fly fishing in the Lower 48 and Mexico, but we don’t hold that against them. 3. Alaska Fly Fishing Online – We admit, this one looks a little long in the tooth, but it’s got so much to offer that we think it belongs on the list. Compare your techniques with the site’s Stalker series outlining strategies for streams, still water and salt. Cruise the Tips section for posts on tying weedless flies and making tougher peacocks. It’s a shame the Members’ Forum doesn’t work, but overall, the information is timeless. 4. Alaska Dispatch News, Anchorage – If you’ve only heard about the story, read in-depth reporting and recaps devoted to Alaskan fishing. It’s not exactly a blog, but it’s a great roundup of information that really impacts our sport. Some stories are controversial, others are entertaining, and they all serve to increase our awareness of Alaska’s incredible natural resources. Feel free to ignore the Politics section, and just concentrate on fishing news. 5. Alaska.org – Technically, this is a travel connection, but we’ve linked you to its Fishing Tips section to give you an idea of how much the site has to offer. The folks on these pages are wildlife biologists, bush pilots, park rangers and photographers who all love fishing Alaska as much as we do. Of course, if you’re planning a trip, we want you to stay with us here at No See Um, but we know you’ll enjoy all the information rounded up on this site. 6. Trout Fishing Alaska – Yes, this site is trout-centric, and it’s not the snazziest presentation on the Internet, but it’s a rock-solid source for all things trout. Cutthroat, steelhead and bow are all covered along with updated information about licenses and stamps. No, you won’t find anything here about salmon, but the tips and techniques are focused on every type of trout that […]

Read More →

Read More →

Top