February, 2016

Our Five Favorite Rivers for Fly Fishing in Alaska

Our Five Favorite Rivers for Fly Fishing in Alaska

Everybody has an opinion. Every fisherman who’s been lucky enough to cast through a perfect day in the Last Frontier knows its best rivers for fly fishing. Every single angler is right, too. Recognizing this fact of fishing life makes it easier for us to put together our list. We know that you know the best, so we’re going to play it safe and just call these five locations our five favorite fly fishing rivers here in Alaska. 1. The Kenai River   Running more 80 wild miles through the Alaskan panhandle to Cook Inlet, this river earns its reputation as a trophy-fish paradise. If that wasn’t enough to land it on our list of favorites, its spectacular backdrop of the Chugach Mountains seals the deal. The lower Kenai’s chinook runs are legendary, and we’re crazy about catching 20-pound rainbows on the upper river. Sockeye numbers from the middle of July through summer’s end can top 1 million. Cohos jump in by early August, and an average Dolly Varden tips the scales at 4 to 6 pounds. We admit that we’re partial to the upper Kenai’s seclusion and scenery. 2. The Copper River You have to love a river that was one of the first in Alaska to receive a catch-and-release-only designation for rainbow fly fishing. You have to call it a favorite for winding pools and undercut banks. This is a river that nature designed for wading with gorgeous stretches through scenic valleys lined with birch, spruce and cottonwood. The Copper is big, and it runs long for 300 miles out of the Wrangell and Chugach Mountains. The star-studded salmon lineup from mid-May through October includes chinook, sockeye and coho, and Copper River rainbows are still some of the biggest in Alaska thanks to that special designation. 3. The Talachulitna River Seeing truly is believing when you can count the fish swimming by. That’s how clear the Talachulitna’s water runs on its way down from Judd Lake in the Beluga Mountains. This incredible stretch earns its place on our list of favorites with a world-class combination of breathtaking scenery and amazing fly fishing action. When someone mentions the Dolly Varden they caught on the Tal, they’ll probably also brag about the chinook, rainbow and grayling they landed. If you dream about casting while majestic, snow-capped mountains look over your shoulder, fly in to one of our favorites, and fish the Talachulitna River. 4. The Alagnak River This tributary of our very own Kvichak River is a perfect spot for folks who are just now discovering the world’s best outdoor sport. Its lower stretches are wide with plenty of sandbars to anchor waders longing to get wet. We especially enjoy schools of silver salmon holding on the shallow edges, and we love chasing kings in the deep channels. The upriver braids are an endless labyrinth of gravel beds and small channels teeming with salmon and rainbows. Some folks like this 69-mile run for whitewater adventures, but we prefer perfecting our […]

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10 Twitter Accounts That Every Fly Fisherman Should Follow

10 Twitter Accounts That Every Fly Fisherman Should Follow

Imagine asking a fly fisherman here in Alaska about tweets 10 years ago. Picture that same angler scratching his head and wondering why you wanted to talk about chickadees. Today, Twitter has everybody hooked, and we can’t resist hashing the tags. Here’s our list of 10 Twitter accounts that every fly fisherman should follow. 1. Fly Fishing Report @FlyFishReport This latest entry in the Twitterverse doesn’t have a website yet. They do have a passion for everything about fly fishing, and their tweets hook up with breaking news, plenty of pics and great videos. FFR promises to go live in the next few months, so we strongly recommend staying tuned. RT @wildsalmoncntr: Oh, that all salmon rivers look like this! Let’s protect our last, best https://t.co/VtstcUiTBG pic.twitter.com/A1tNoh0tSb — Fly Fishing Report (@FlyFishReport) January 15, 2016 2. Simms Fishing @SimmsFishing If you’re one of the oldest fly fishing gear companies in the world, you tweet about it. We give Simms credit for focusing on tips, techniques and conservation without overselling their goods. Interested in a beautiful shot of rainbows charging minnows? Yes, they lure us in with wonderful photography. Support fish-focussed management and preserve prime salmon and trout habititat in Alaska. https://t.co/jOZy8Za7yG pic.twitter.com/DBpRHSI4Lt — Simms Fishing (@simmsfishing) December 17, 2015 3. Sage Fly Fishing @SageFlyFish Again, we’re linking up with commercial tweets, but founder Don Green always had our respect as one of the world’s master fly rod designers. It’s good to see his legacy live on in the digital world. Enjoy a mix of breaking news and breathtaking pictures. Yes, they also bait us with product updates. Ambassador Mark Raisler of @headhuntersfly with a gorgeous brown. #sageflyfish http://t.co/zOT9Vgytm4 pic.twitter.com/N5JX1aVSzU — Sage Fly Fish (@sageflyfish) September 27, 2015 4. Redington @RedingtonGear We aren’t endorsing. We just call them like we follow them. Redington’s innovative products are always worth a quick read. Besides, one click leads to another, and suddenly you’re linked up with a fly fishing story on the other side of the globe. No, they don’t tempt us with enough pictures. Battle for the flats. #findyourwater #vapenblack #behemoth @thebugparade pic.twitter.com/UFioKYq6OL — Redington (@RedingtonGear) January 24, 2016 5. April Vokey @AprilVokey We’re OK that she’s down in British Columbia because she’s developed her Fly Gal guide service into a network with worldwide connections. For a dedicated conservationist, Vokey has a seriously entertaining attitude, and that makes her tweets worth following. We always learn something new too. Long casts & separated loops go “hand in hand”! Yes, that was a cheesy pun. pic.twitter.com/R1EnYCNnHd — April Vokey- Fly Gal (@AprilVokey) October 28, 2015 6. Field & Stream @FieldandStream We wonder at what the first publishers of this icon might think if you could transport them here from 1895. We marvel at how well an old flagship bridges the divide between print and tweet. Enjoy top-notch content that’s always relevant even if it doesn’t give us as much fly fishing as we’d like. Kirk Deeter’s Fly-Fishing Tip: Consider Shadows and Sun https://t.co/gZFRWj0rY2 pic.twitter.com/jWLXSp3jSB — Field […]

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